Gugelhupf: A Delicate German Bread

An Oktoberfest Classic – the Sweet German Bread Gugelhupf

Our second recipe in the Oktoberfest celebration is Gugelhupf, a classic German sweet bread. It is traditionally eaten before dinner alongside a sweet German wine such as Liebfraumilch or Riesling.  This delicate bread has the sweet flavor of lemon and vanilla; and it is full of golden raisins, currants, and almonds.

The bread is baked in a classic Gugelhupf pan.  Mine was given to me by a dear German friend who was an incredible cook and baker, and who first introduced me Gugelhupf. You can also use a deep bundt pan.

This recipe is adapted from a German cookbook called GERMAN BAKING TODAY that I bought during my travels in Dusseldorf, Germany.

Gugelhupf

Ingredients:

7 oz (7/8 cup) whipping cream
1 cup butter
4 cup flour
1 packet of fast action dried yeast
3/4 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 teaspoon almond flavoring
1 pinch salt
4 medium eggs
3/4 cup golden raisins
3/4 cup currants
3/4 cup chopped blanched almonds

Directions:

Warm the whipping cream in a small pan and melt the butter in it.  Temperature should not reach more than 120 degrees Fahrenheit.

To make the dough, carefully mix together half the flour, dried yeast and sugar.  Add the melted butter and margarine and mix together with the regular beater in the mixer bowl.   Add 2 of the eggs, the rest of flour and mix together.  Add the remaining 2 eggs.  When mixed together add the vanilla and lemon flavoring.  Change beater to a bread hook.  Mix well and then add the raisins, currents, and almonds.

Cover bowl with clean towel and let dough raise in warm place until dough begins to visibly increase in volume.

Thoroughly grease and flour the Gugelhupf mold baking pan (or your bundt pan).

Place dough into the pan.

Cover with clean towel and let raise until visibly increasing in volume.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Bake Gugelhupf for 1 hour until toothpick comes out clean.

Leave the bread in the mold for about 10 minutes after taking it out of the oven.

Then, remove from the mold and put on a rack to cool down.

Dust with confectioner’s sugar when cool. Serve with a sweet German wine.

O’ zapft is’!!!

(Said by the Mayor of Munich after he opens the first keg for Oktoberfest- see it here.  This is the beginning of Oktoberfest).

Roseddy

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Gugelhupf: A Delicate German Bread

Gugelhupf is a classic German sweet bread. It is traditionally eaten before dinner alongside a sweet German wine such as Liebfraumilch or Riesling. This delicate bread has the sweet flavor of lemon and vanilla; and it is full of golden raisins, currants, and almonds. The bread is baked in a classic Gugelhupf pan - you can also use a deep bundt pan.

Ingredients:

7 oz (7/8 cup) whipping cream
1 cup butter
4 cup flour
1 packet of fast action dried yeast
3/4 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 teaspoon almond flavoring
1 pinch salt
4 medium eggs
3/4 cup golden raisins
3/4 cup currants
3/4 cup chopped blanched almonds

Directions:

Warm the whipping cream in a small pan and melt the butter in it. Temperature should not reach more than 120 degrees Fahrenheit.

To make the dough, carefully mix together half the flour, dried yeast and sugar. Add the melted butter and margarine and mix together with the regular beater in the mixer bowl. Add 2 of the eggs, the rest of flour and mix together. Add the remaining 2 eggs. When mixed together add the vanilla and lemon flavoring. Change beater to a bread hook. Mix well and then add the raisins, currents, and almonds.

Cover bowl with clean towel and let dough raise in warm place until dough begins to visibly increase in volume.

Thoroughly grease and flour the Gugelhupf mold baking pan (or your bundt pan).

Place dough into the pan.

Cover with clean towel and let raise until visibly increasing in volume.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Bake Gugelhupf for 1 hour until toothpick comes out clean.

Leave the bread in the mold for about 10 minutes after taking it out of the oven.

Then, remove from the mold and put on a rack to cool down.

Dust with confectioner’s sugar when cool. Serve with a sweet German wine.

O' zapft is'!!!

Roseddy

Adapted from a German cookbook called GERMAN BAKING TODAY.

The matriarch of Live Pretty, Roseddy, lives with her husband and children in Orlando, Florida. She is a native of Waynesburg, PA, but she has called the Sunshine State home for over thirty years. In addition to being a fantastic cook, Roseddy is an accomplished seamstress and former Home Economics instructor. Her flower arranging talents are the stuff of legend, and she is a valued member of her church’s altar guild. Roseddy enjoys entertaining, traveling with her husband, and, of course, a good martini.

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